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The Shaft: Arrow Pics and Discussion

Discussion in 'Arrows And Bolts' started by LAZY EYED SNIPER, Dec 20, 2011.

  1. LAZY EYED SNIPER

    LAZY EYED SNIPER Overwatch Staff Member Administrator Supporter "Philanthropist"

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    21,112
    Have any questions about arrows? Do you prefer fiberglass, aluminium alloy, carbon fiber, or maybe composite materials? Anybody still using or making wooden arrows? If so, what type of wood works best for you? Let's see some pics and discussion...
  2. John A.

    John A. I'm "THAT" guy Staff Member Global Moderator Moderator

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    I prefer aluminum.
  3. LAZY EYED SNIPER

    LAZY EYED SNIPER Overwatch Staff Member Administrator Supporter "Philanthropist"

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    21,112
    I do too these days.

    Back 20 years or so ago when I was doing some serious target shooting carbon fiber was the big thing. They performed great, but can't tell you how many of those suckers I snapped pulling out of targets...
  4. OhioArcher

    OhioArcher Where's da fishes? Supporter "Philanthropist"

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    3,817
    For target archery (compound) we are shooting carbon-aluminum shafts that are .200" diameter or under. Very expensive but very durable. Fly extremely well especially at the longer distances (70M and up) in the wind. With changes to the shooting formats driven by World Archery our distances are shrinking. Most USA Archery events compounds only shoot 50M while recurves shoot 70M. So we may see a change in arrow size--fatter arrows may provide an extra point or two if close to a line.

    Hunting is all carbon for me. While I have had some carbon arrows that broken if I looked at them wrong the newer ones are extremely durable. I can't say how many shoots I have on the Gold Tips I hunt with. But I'm on my 3rd or 4th season with them.

    And reloading arrows is far easy than reloading ammo...LOL...;-)
  5. DHonovich

    DHonovich Founder Staff Member Administrator Sponsor "Philanthropist"

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    6,921
    Lina uses Beman ICS Hunter Junior's
    [​IMG]
    and I use the Beman Carbon Speed 400's
    [​IMG]

    This is only my second season of archery so I don't have a lot of experience with other brands or types.
  6. OhioArcher

    OhioArcher Where's da fishes? Supporter "Philanthropist"

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    3,817
    Beman makes some good arrows. Shot them the first couple of years I got into archery. Went thru a couple other brands before settling on the GT's. Shot quite a bit of 3D. Broke a lot of arrows, some for almost no reason (bad hit, bad angle). The basement is covered with old arrows and the broken ones. Today any of the name brands are quality arrows.
  7. MikeD

    MikeD I'm Your Huckleberry Staff Member Global Moderator "Philanthropist"

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    11,664
    Ironically I use carbon for my traditional bows and aluminum for everything else.

    At the higher speeds tuning carbon becomes way to much of a PITA for me and I will just use alum that has pretty much the same spine regardless of shaft. I've also seen a few carbons explode upon being shot and that alone scared me enough to not use them.

    I'm all about slow and heavy projectiles. ;-D
  8. John A.

    John A. I'm "THAT" guy Staff Member Global Moderator Moderator

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    13,789
    I only have 2 brands of arrows at the moment. Some Easton xx75 Magnum (Aluminum) and some Carbon Express 2219 (Aluminum) and Carbon Express Surge* (Carbon).

    So realistically, I don't have a lot of experience with other brands. But these seem to be working well for me, so...
  9. OhioArcher

    OhioArcher Where's da fishes? Supporter "Philanthropist"

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    3,817
    The carbons "explode" when the shooters don't check them like they should. I have found a few of mine with cracks that could have led to problems but if you stay on top of them, not shoot them after they have hit something hard (like a wall, post, rock), they last a long time. Aluminum bends so you know it "ain't right". Carbon arrows can hide it so they need to be checked regularly.
  10. dieselmudder

    dieselmudder .30-06 Elite Member "Philanthropist"

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    2,041
    Okay so wanting to get back into bow hunting, ive been out of the loop for about 15 years or so. Ive figured out i need something in the 350 grain range (before field tip/broadhead) and 28 inches. I'm pulling 60 lbs, with a 27" draw length. Seems everyone sells fletched shafts, not ready to go arrows. Way back when, my father and I used to make our own, but they were aluminum. I would like to go carbon. Any place i can just order 6 or 12 in the size I need reasonably priced.
  11. John A.

    John A. I'm "THAT" guy Staff Member Global Moderator Moderator

    Messages:
    13,789
  12. OhioArcher

    OhioArcher Where's da fishes? Supporter "Philanthropist"

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    3,817
    Arrows are usually sold only with or without fletchings so you or the shop can make them to match your bow. But the one place I know you can get them custom made is www.huntersfriend.com It has quite a bit of good info to help you decide which way you want to go.

    You don't say what your shooting, compound or recurve. Makes a huge difference in what arrows you need.
  13. OhioArcher

    OhioArcher Where's da fishes? Supporter "Philanthropist"

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    3,817
    Most people don't know, or ignore, the need to inspect your arrows after every shot. Most print the info on the label nowadays. Carbons provide many more options than the aluminums (which you can still get and are readily available).
  14. dieselmudder

    dieselmudder .30-06 Elite Member "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    2,041
    Oh, its compound. Didnt think to mention that. last arrows i bought were Easton aluminum, got a set of 6, probably at gander mountain or rural king. Theyre 29" and about 550 grain with field tip. (125 grain field tip) i think. Im moderatly accurate with them, at 15 yards. Enough to hit a kill zone in my opinion, but at 20 they really start to spread out, and fly like a wet noodle.
  15. OhioArcher

    OhioArcher Where's da fishes? Supporter "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    3,817
    The big thing is to get a set that is "spine" matched to you and your bow. Carbon arrows are made with different thicknesses of the wall to allow the arrow to bend as it is fired. Too weak a spine, the arrow bends too much. Too strong, it doesn't bend enough. The lower the spine number, the heavier the arrow, generally speaking. The spine affects how well a carbon arrow comes off the bow and, therefore, its accuracy downrange. You'll see the spine listed as 300, 350, 400, etc. Some, like Goldtips, have spines like 3555, 5575, 7595.

    Just a rough guess but you'll probably need a 350-400 spined arrow. Depends on what weight broadhead you're going to use. More weight up front, the more the arrow will bend when released (the inertia of the broadhead resists the forward movement of the arrow causing it too bend a bit more). I shoot Goldtip Pro Hunter 5575's with 100 gn Rage broadheads and approx. 55-57 lbs on my bow. They fly pretty well and hit close to my field points (broadhead tuning is a whole other discussion).

    Each arrow mfr has an arrow chart on their website that allows you to see what they recommend for your type of bow. Not all bows are created equal and the IBO or AMO speed rating will also dictate what shaft you should use.

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